Leeds man found guilty of charges in Jan. 6 Capitol breach

(WNEM)
Published: Jan. 15, 2023 at 10:39 AM CST
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BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (WBRC) - The U.S. Department of Justice says a man from Leeds was found guilty yesterday of felony and misdemeanor charges related to the Jan. 6, 2021 Capitol breach.

Joshua Matthew Black, 46, was charged with entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds with a deadly or dangerous weapon; disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds with a deadly or dangerous weapon; unlawful possession of a dangerous weapon on Capitol grounds or buildings; entering and remaining on the floor of Congress; and disorderly conduct in a Capitol building, according to the Department of Justice.

According to evidence, Black entered the Capitol Building and was seen in videos and photos posted on social media standing in the Senate Chamber.

Black also posted a video on YouTube where he explains how he entered the Capitol Building with a knife, according to the DOJ:

“He explained that ‘once we found out Pence turned on us and that they had stolen the election, like officially, the . . . crowd went crazy. I mean, . . .  it became a mob.  We crossed the gate, we got up.’  He also admitted carrying a knife to the Capitol because ‘you’re not allowed to carry guns in DC and I don’t like being defenseless.’”

In a search of Black’s residence on Jan. 14, 2021 the FBI found the knife that he admitted carrying in the Capitol. He was arrested by the FBI later that day in Moody.

U.S. District Court Judge Amy Berman Jackson has scheduled a sentencing hearing for May 5, 2023.

The charges of entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds with a deadly or dangerous weapon and disorderly and disruptive conduct in restricted building or grounds with a deadly or dangerous weapon carry a statutory maximum sentence of 10 years.  The charge of unlawful possession of a dangerous weapon on Capitol grounds or buildings carries a statutory maximum sentence of five years. The charges of entering and remaining on the floor of Congress and disorderly conduct in a Capitol building carry up to six months. All charges carry potential financial penalties.

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