Moderna clinical trial participant shares his experience

COVID vaccine trial participant shares experience

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (WBRC) - Drug maker, Moderna, said its vaccine is proving highly effective at preventing COVID-19 in clinical trials.

A participant in that trial is talking about his experience, saying it was his civic duty, and being a part of the clinical trial was important to him to help us all advance through this pandemic.

Marc Ryan admits his reasons for wanting to participate in the clinical trial for Moderna’s vaccine weren’t completely unselfish.

“I was looking at it like…you know…there was a chance that I could get some protection out of this, but also definitely…you know…wanting to do whatever I can to help us all get through this,” Ryan said.

Ryan lives in South Carolina in a part of the state that’s been a hot spot for the virus.

He said he felt convicted to enroll in the study despite his family’s strong disapproval.

“The way I looked at it was like this, if I had a bad outcome from the vaccine, I could rest assured knowing I also would not have done well with the virus. I would say that you would much rather have this then get the virus,” Ryan explained.

Moderna enrolled 30,000 participants into its phase three double-blind study.

So, neither the participants, nor the medical staff handling injections, knows who go what.

“I had a fever, I had body aches, I had real intense fatigue, I had some high blood pressure during this experience and there was…the day after I got the shot was pretty intense,” Ryan said.

Still, Ryan believes everyone should get vaccinated, including those who are skeptical.

“All of the scientists are saying the way through this is through herd immunity. Now, we can get…we can have half a million people die if we achieve herd immunity by everyone just getting sick, right? This is a much safer way to do this,” Ryan explained.

Ryan said he did plenty of research before he enrolled in the trial and said at no point did he feel his life was in danger.

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