Homeschooling inquiries up since pandemic hit

Is homeschooling an option?

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (WBRC) - The CDC has released some new guidelines for how schools should reopen this fall and that’s causing some parents to rethink how their children will receive their education.

Some parents are considering homeschooling their kids this fall. Some are citing the flexibility homeschooling brings, while others just don’t feel safe sending their kids back to traditional school during this pandemic.

One-way routes in hallways, no shared spaces, like lunchrooms and playgrounds, social distancing, and face masks. Those are just some of the guidelines the CDC recommends for schools reopening this fall, and that has Jason Bagley rethinking how his daughter will receive her education.

“I’m sure the school systems has the option of whether or not to implement some of those or not implement them, and that’s fine, but I think that they were way out of line. I have nothing against public schools, I don’t have anything against the CDC, but I think I know what’s best for my child,” Bagley said.

Bagley and his family have been looking into homeschooling for a couple of years now, but the pandemic solidified his decision to start the process.

“It just allows us to have so much flexibility and still educate the kids,” said Kaye Tompkins. She started homeschooling her children, about 10 years ago. She said she went into it kicking and screaming at first, but now believes the benefits outweigh the challenges.

“We rarely get sick, which is really nice because even in the flu seasons, and the stomach bug seasons, or this pandemic, we really don’t…I don’t have the kids in that kind of environment all the time. They basically go to church, they do their sports activities, and we’re at home,” Tompkins said.

Haley Dailey is a homeschool administrator for The Way, The Truth, and The Life Christian School.

She said she has seen an increase in inquiries about homeschooling since the pandemic hit, but before you decide to pull your children out of a regular classroom, Dailey said to make sure it’s something your family can manage.

“It really needs to be a decision that you can commit to. That’s a big thing that I’ve seen, is that they get started and they’re all excited and then it doesn’t go like they had it in their mind, and then they just quit. So, I think that is scary. You’ve got to remember that you’re in that for the long haul and that for a whole year, or a whole lifetime, until they’re 18, 19 years old, so it’s definitely a decision not to be taken lightly,” Dailey said.

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