Cullman Co. Sheriff wants voters to vote ‘yes’ on jail food amendment

Cullman Co. Jail Food Amendment

BIRMINGHAM, AL (WBRC) - The Cullman County Sheriff wants to give voters a chance to change an old law.

It’s called the Sheriff’s Food Bill.

“One of our top priorities is to let the citizens have a voice in changing a law,” said Sheriff Matt Gentry.

Sheriff Matt Gentry
Sheriff Matt Gentry (Source: WBRC)

It’s a law that Sheriff Gentry said gives Alabama a bad rap.

“It’s an issue that comes up every four years, and everybody recognizes that,” he said. “And they’re motivated to help change it here in Cullman County to get that stigma away from our Sheriff’s Office.”

He’s talking about an old state law that makes sheriffs financially responsible for feeding jail inmates.

And whatever is left over, the sheriff can use for personal use.

It’s a law that Etowah County’s Sheriff Todd Entrekin got a lot of heat for, and one Sheriff Gentry said he’s ready to change in his county by putting a local constitutional amendment on the ballot November 6.

Cullman Co. jail food funds amendment on ballot
Cullman Co. jail food funds amendment on ballot (Source: WBRC)

“What this will do is it will take it from being a personal financial responsibility of the sheriff, and it will make it a public account. It’s still by the sheriff of the county, but it is a public account that will be transparent to the people, will be audited every two years with our other discretionary accounts,” he said.

Sheriff Gentry said, if voters vote 'yes’ on the local amendment, instead of pocketing the leftover funds, the money would be used for law enforcement purposes, like equipment for deputies, or community meetings.

Cullman Co. jail food funds amendment on ballot
Cullman Co. jail food funds amendment on ballot (Source: WBRC)

“It’s a subject we’ve never shied away from, but this is a way that we can change it and do good for our community,” said Sheriff Gentry.

It’s the last item on the ballot. To learn more, you can click here.

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