Birmingham's Sister March shows solidarity with women's marches - WBRC FOX6 News - Birmingham, AL

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Birmingham's Sister March shows solidarity with women's marches nationwide

Source: Lydia Hu/WBRC Source: Lydia Hu/WBRC
Source: Lydia Hu/WBRC Source: Lydia Hu/WBRC
Source: Lydia Hu/WBRC Source: Lydia Hu/WBRC
BIRMINGHAM, AL (WBRC) -

As thousands of women marched in the nation's capital in protest of President Trump, demonstrators around the nation prepared to march in solidarity.

Birmingham Police estimate between 4,500 and 5000 people rallied and marched Saturday in Kelly Ingram Park in the Birmingham Sister March. They stood shoulder to shoulder as Mayor William Bell, City Councilor Sheila Tyson, Representative Patricia Todd and others spoke to the crowd.

"I want everyone to look at a woman. Everyone woman, look at a woman and repeat after me: 'I am my sister's keeper," Tyson shouted to the crowd.

The crowd shouted back, "I am my sister's keeper."

It was a peaceful protest as they marched from the park, around the block and returned to the park.

Marchers said they wanted their voices heard. They want equal rights for women. They want healthcare for all. Some signs said they weren't going back to the 1950s.

Ben Creager marched in hopes of equality for his daughters.

"For my daughters – I've got two of them and I want them to have the same rights as everyone else," he explained.

One by one, the demonstrators shared their messages for President Trump.

"I'm a Muslim woman and I have a voice. Just because I wear a headscarf on my head doesn't make me not me an American citizen,” Tala Samour said.

"President Trump, listen to the people, election is over, now you need to express humility and show you care about what people think,” Richard Berliner said.

"Americans come in all shapes and sizes, all religions, all colors, all genders and all of us together here are what makes American already great," Saman Najmi added.

Even after the march, throngs of people stayed, some cheering, “yes we can, yes we can.”

Some protesters recognize Birmingham as hallowed ground, the birthplace of the civil rights movement, and they say this is the next chapter.

?Copyright 2017 WBRC. All rights reserved.

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