50 years later, marchers retrace steps of 'Bloody Tuesday' - WBRC FOX6 News - Birmingham, AL

50 years later, marchers retrace steps of 'Bloody Tuesday'

A marcher holds a sign commemorating the 50th anniversary of Bloody Tuesday. Source: Kelvin Reynolds/WBRC A marcher holds a sign commemorating the 50th anniversary of Bloody Tuesday. Source: Kelvin Reynolds/WBRC
People met at the First African Baptist Church before the march began on Tuesday, June 10, 2014. Source: Kelvin Reynolds/WBRC People met at the First African Baptist Church before the march began on Tuesday, June 10, 2014. Source: Kelvin Reynolds/WBRC
Marchers walked from First African Baptist Church to the Tuscaloosa County courthouse. Source: Kelvin Reynolds/WBRC Marchers walked from First African Baptist Church to the Tuscaloosa County courthouse. Source: Kelvin Reynolds/WBRC
The crowd of marchers in front of the courthouse. Source: Kelvin Reynolds/WBRC The crowd of marchers in front of the courthouse. Source: Kelvin Reynolds/WBRC
Marchers spoke on the steps of the Tuscaloosa County courthouse, where the march ended. Source: Kelvin Reynolds/WBRC Marchers spoke on the steps of the Tuscaloosa County courthouse, where the march ended. Source: Kelvin Reynolds/WBRC
TUSCALOOSA, AL (WBRC) -

Hundreds of people marched in the streets of Tuscaloosa to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Bloody Tuesday.

On that day 50 years ago, people tried to march for civil rights from a downtown Tuscaloosa church to the county courthouse. They were stopped by police and deputized citizens who beat them unmercifully.

Now 50 years later,some of those same people finished the march they started so long ago. Several hundred people joined in the march, which began at the First African Baptist Church.

Police were also there this time, but instead of attacking people, they protected marchers from traffic. The route stretched from Stillman Boulevard to Greensboro Avenue in front of the Tuscaloosa County courthouse.

Organizers say the original march was about standing up for equal rights and access to public facilities. Now, they say what they went through was worth it.

"And things have really changed over the last 50 years. We know we still have a long way to go. We know there's some things that still haven't been accomplished. But thank God for his mercy that we are where we are today," said Oscar Watts, who marched in Bloody Tuesday.

The march concluded three days of events in Tuscaloosa commemorating the 50th anniversary of Bloody Tuesday.

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