Classmates remember Horizons student killed by MAX Dart bus - WBRC FOX6 News - Birmingham, AL

Classmates remember Horizons student killed by MAX Dart bus

Pouneh Bahri, a 25-year-old student at the Horizons School, was hit and killed by a MAX Dart bus in Birmingham on Tuesday. Pouneh Bahri, a 25-year-old student at the Horizons School, was hit and killed by a MAX Dart bus in Birmingham on Tuesday.
Students and members of the community left flowers and cards at the front desk in Bahri's memory. Source: WBRC video Students and members of the community left flowers and cards at the front desk in Bahri's memory. Source: WBRC video
Horizons students brought individual roses in Bahri's memory to the school. Source: WBRC video Horizons students brought individual roses in Bahri's memory to the school. Source: WBRC video
BIRMINGHAM, AL (WBRC) -

While the investigation into the death of 25-year-old Pouneh Bahri continues, students at her special needs school are remembering her.

Bahri was struck and killed by a MAX Dart bus Tuesday afternoon. She had just left class when she was hit by the bus, which looks like a street trolley, about a block away from the school.

On Wednesday, flowers for Pouneh decorated the front desk in the lobby of Horizons School. Horizons students brought individual roses in her memory. People who live and work around the school have also been dropping off cards expressing their sorrow.

"I think anytime you can make something concrete for them, it's a tangible way to remember who she is that she is still with us," Jade Carter, the Executive Director of The Horizons School said.

Carter said the school will have grief counselors on hand and there have been offers of help from the religious community on Southside.

"Anytime you have an organization like this it's not just a school, it's family and when you lose a member of your family everyone is touched and responds in a different way," Carter said.

The students have been encouraged to create a project to describe how Bahri impacted their lives.

Bahri was from Centreville, Virginia. One report said when she was younger she had brain surgery which removed part of her brain to stop multiple seizures.

"She is like the energizer bunny. You and I couldn't do what she did on a daily basis to get through a day. We would have lost hope," Carter said.

Bahri did not lose hope. Her parents let her come to Birmingham to learn independent living. According to her Facebook page, she worked at the non-profit Ronald McDonald House. Carter said Bahri wanted to create a life on her own.

"She wanted to be a grown up. She wanted to be independent. She wanted her mother to stop telling her what to do and her daddy to stop taking care of her," Carter said.

The school plans to have a memorial in Bahri's memory.

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