Homeowners concerned about hunting around Lake Purdy - WBRC FOX6 News - Birmingham, AL

Homeowners concerned about hunting around Lake Purdy

Homeowners around the Lake Purdy area are concerned about hunting on 5,000 acres of land recently sold by the Birmingham Water Works Board to Westervelt Wildlife. Source: WBRC video Homeowners around the Lake Purdy area are concerned about hunting on 5,000 acres of land recently sold by the Birmingham Water Works Board to Westervelt Wildlife. Source: WBRC video
LEEDS, AL (WBRC) -

Homeowner and property owners in Leeds and other areas around Lake Purdy are asking questions about hunting practices on five thousand acres of land.

The Birmingham Water Works Board earlier this month sold the hunting rights to Westervelt Wildlife formerly Gulf States for $10.

Westervelt has sold hunting right leases to others. The BWWB will share in the proceeds each year.

Jerry Wilson lives just across the road from where one hunting group is expected to gather.

"Where they skin the deer, gut the deer. Drink their beer. Leave trash. Pull up in their trucks and four wheelers, hooting and hollering, 'Who is going there? Who is going there yonder?' Who wants to wake to that at four o'clock in the morning?" Wilson said.

Wilson and other property owners wanted the opportunity to bid on leasing the land out before Westervelt got it. When he tried to lease from Westervelt he was told the leases were gone.

"It should have gone out to public notice first. Let the public know what is going on. A public bid instead leaving the land to them for ten dollars," Wilson said.

At the Red Barn, a non-profit organization runs a program for disabled children. Executive Director Joy O'Neal wanted to lease some of the property also but was told the leases were gone.

O'Neal wanted more riding trails for the children and now wants to know how the land will be managed by the leaseholders.

"Camping that might be done on the property. ATV usage that might create trails, muddy runoff that might go into the river. We are concerned about what will happen to our property values," O'Neal said.

O'Neal said there is concern Westervelt will cut away timber which could affect the area environmentally, driving off animals to other communities.

"My top concern we can't get any information about activities that will be allowed on the property across the street," O'Neal said.

Fox6 News tried to contact representatives of the BWWB and Westervelt Wildlife but was unable to get a response to some of the communities concerns.

A BWWB committee meeting is expected to be held Thursday. Wilson and O'Neal say they plan to be there looking for answers.

Copyright 2013 WBRC. All rights reserved.

Powered by Frankly