Reactions to U.S. Appeals Court Oct. 14 decision

In response to the U.S. Appeals Court ruling, Gov. Bentley released the following statement:

"Today's decision by the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals is simply one more step in what we knew would be a lengthy legal process.  As I have said on many occasions, if the federal government had done its job by enforcing its own immigration laws, we wouldn't be here today.  Unfortunately, by failing to do its job, the federal government has left the problem of dealing with illegal immigration to the states. Alabama needed a tough law against illegal immigration.  We now have one.   I will continue to fight to see this law upheld."

Attorney General Luther Strange also issued a response to the ruling:

"We respectfully disagree with the Court of Appeals ruling temporarily enjoining additional sections of the Act, but are pleased that the Court has allowed the State to proceed enforcing some of the Act's central provisions.  We will continue to vigorously defend the law as we proceed through the appeals process."

A civil rights coalition including the Southern Poverty Law Center, the American Civil Liberties Union, the National Immigration Law Center, ACLU of Alabama, the Asian Law Caucus, the National Day Laborers' Organizing Network, AAJC, andthe Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund.

"We are pleased that the court blocked these damaging elements of the law. But portions of the law that remain in place will continue to exacerbate the humanitarian crisis in Alabama. In just two weeks that the law has been in effect, families have been fleeing the state, children have been pulled out of schools, and businesses have been put in jeopardy. This law sadly revisits Alabama's painful racial past and tramples the rights of all its residents."

Interim State Superintendent of Education Larry Craven issued the following statement:

"The United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Judicial Circuit entered an order today that stops the implementation of Section 28 of Alabama's Immigration Law pending resolution of the appeal.

All schools will cease to identify birth origin of students through birth certificates or affidavits as previously directed. Schools will revert to enrollment procedures in effect prior to September 29."

A statement from Rep. Terri A. Sewell:

"I am pleased that the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals has intervened and stayed certain provisions of Alabama's Immigration Law. The provisions that were blocked would have required proof of lawful residency in the United States and would have tracked immigration information about newly enrolled students. I believe that Alabama's immigration law is overly broad and opens the door to subjective profiling, which creates uncertainty and distress in our communities. The unfortunate and unintended consequences resulting from this law have already been experienced in our state's schools, in long lines at our Departments of Motor Vehicles and in the mass exodus of many Hispanic Americans from Alabama. These citizens are fearful of the impact this law may have on their families, communities and work environments. Many of the provisions that have not been blocked by the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals are equally overreaching in their scope and should also be revisited. It is the job of our federal government to ensure consistency in America's approach to the growing need for a comprehensive plan that addresses our nation's immigrant population.  I look forward to working in Congress on a comprehensive federal immigration policy that is balanced and fair. "

From the U.S. Department of Justice:

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"We are pleased that the Eleventh Circuit has blocked Alabama's registration provisions which criminalized unlawful presence and chilled access to a public education.  We continue to believe that the other key provisions we challenged are also preempted, and we look forward to the upcoming consideration by the court of appeals of the merits of the appeal."

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"I am pleased that the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals has intervened and stayed certain provisions of Alabama's Immigration Law. The provisions that were blocked would have required proof of lawful residency in the United States and would have tracked immigration information about newly enrolled students. I believe that Alabama's immigration law is overly broad and opens the door to subjective profiling, which creates uncertainty and distress in our communities. The unfortunate and unintended consequences resulting from this law have already been experienced in our state's schools, in long lines at our Departments of Motor Vehicles and in the mass exodus of many Hispanic Americans from Alabama. These citizens are fearful of the impact this law may have on their families, communities and work environments. Many of the provisions that have not been blocked by the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals are equally overreaching in their scope and should also be revisited. It is the job of our federal government to ensure consistency in America's approach to the growing need for a comprehensive plan that addresses our nation's immigrant population.  I look forward to working in Congress on a comprehensive federal immigration policy that is balanced and fair. "